Democracy won’t work if young people continue wandering in need

By Geoffrey Ngui from Kenya


A nation that invests in the youth is poised to make immeasurable progress. Young people, at any quarter make the workforce of any nation and they are the ones who build the nation, making development enactments a reality. Africa has a relatively young population with young people being the dominant demographic group, comprising 60% of the continent’s total population. This means by any chance Africa should be among the top developed continents in the world. The resources the continent has, added to a burgeoning workforce places Africa competitively in the global economy, politics and every other thing. Sadly, the continent is still the poorest in the world, and little efforts to develop and modernize it begin, a clear testimony that it has to show woken up, and are ready to move up the ladder. 

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BURUNDI WITHDRAWAL FROM THE INTERNATIONAL CRIMINAL COURT: WHAT NEXT?

Photo credits: www.thestar.com

The Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court alias the International Criminal Court Statute or the Rome Statute is a treaty that established the International Criminal Court (ICC) which was adopted at a diplomatic conference in Rome on 17 July 1998 and entered into force on 1 July 2002. The court is based at The Hague in Netherlands and has jurisdiction on four core international crimes i.e. genocide, crimes against humanity, war crimes, and the crime of aggression. These crimes are not subject to any statute of limitations and can only be investigated and prosecuted by the ICC in situations where states are unable or unwilling to do so themselves.

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PEACEFUL PROTESTS IN AFRICA

Protests, whether peaceful or otherwise, have been in existence for a long time in one form or another. The underlying factor or main reason for protests are the desires of an individual or group that feels the need to change to improve the current condition of the resisting person or group; be it political, social or economic.

According to Snow et al. (2004) a protest is a form of collective action and of social movement participation at the same time. Wright et al (1990) proposed a framework which categorizes protests based on three distinctions: the first between inaction and action, the second between actions directed at improving one’s personal conditions (individual action) and actions directed at improving the conditions of one’s group (collective action) and thirdly; the distinction between actions that conform to the norms of the existing social system (normative action like petitioning and taking part in a demonstration) and those that violate existing social rules (non-normative action like illegal protests and civil disobedience).

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